Which Of The Following Enforces The Rules That Apply To Federal Elections?

Who enforces federal laws?

The Federal Election Commission enforces federal campaign finance laws, including monitoring donation prohibitions, and limits and oversees public funding for presidential campaigns.

Who has the power to regulate elections under the constitution?

Article I, Section 4, Clause 1: The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.

Who enforces the electoral college?

Article II, Section 1, Clause 2, disqualifies all elected and appointed federal officials from being electors. The Office of the Federal Register is charged with administering the Electoral College. After the vote, each state sends to Congress a certified record of their electoral votes, called the Certificate of Vote.

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What did the Federal Election Campaign Act do?

The 1971 Election Laws 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA, effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements.

What makes a federal law?

Federal laws are bills that have passed both houses of Congress, been signed by the president, passed over the president’s veto, or allowed to become law without the president’s signature. Legislative measures that have been introduced in Congress but have not become law are known as bills.

What branch makes federal laws?

Congress is the legislative branch of the federal government and makes laws for the nation. Congress has two legislative bodies or chambers: the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

What does the Constitution say about presidential elections?

The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or

What does Article 1 Section 4 of the Constitution mean?

Article I, Section 4, gives state legislatures the task of determining how congressional elections are to be held. With the passage of the Civil Rights Acts of 1957 and 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Congress extended protection of the right to vote in federal, state and local elections.

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What does the 26 Amendment say?

The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

Why did the Founding Fathers create the Electoral College?

The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. Several weeks after the general election, electors from each state meet in their state capitals and cast their official vote for president and vice president.

Who makes up the Electoral College and how are they selected?

Who selects the electors? Choosing each State’s electors is a two-part process. First, the political parties in each State choose slates of potential electors sometime before the general election. Second, during the general election, the voters in each State select their State’s electors by casting their ballots.

What is the Electoral College in simple terms?

The United States Electoral College is a name used to describe the official 538 Presidential electors who come together every four years during the presidential election to give their official votes for President and Vice President of the United States. No state can have fewer than three electors.

What was the purpose of the Federal Election Campaign Act quizlet?

A law passed in 1974 for reforming campaign finances. The act created the Federal Election Commission, provided public financing for presidential primaries and general elections, limited presidential campaign spending, required disclosure, and attempted to limit contributions.

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What was the purpose of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 quizlet?

Terms in this set (29) The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (FECA,, et seq.) is a United States federal law which increased disclosure of contributions for federal campaigns, and amended in 1974 to place legal limits on the campaign contributions. The amendment also created the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

What power does the FEC have?

The Federal Election Commission (FEC) is the independent regulatory agency charged with administering and enforcing the federal campaign finance law. The FEC has jurisdiction over the financing of campaigns for the U.S. House, Senate, Presidency and the Vice Presidency.

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