Question: Elections Where The Electoral College Failed?

Has there ever been a faithless Electoral College vote?

In the modern era, faithless electors are rarer still, and have never determined the outcome of a presidential election. There has been one faithless elector in each of the following elections: 1948, 1956, 1960, 1968, 1972, 1976, and 1988. A blank ballot was cast in 2000.

What did the 12th amendment do to fix the Electoral College?

While the Twelfth Amendment did not change the composition of the Electoral College, it did change the process whereby a president and a vice president are elected. The Twelfth Amendment stipulates that each elector must cast distinct votes for president and vice president, instead of two votes for president.

Who becomes president if no one wins the Electoral College?

If no candidate receives a majority of electoral votes, the House of Representatives elects the President from the three candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each state delegation has one vote. The Senate elects the Vice President from the two vice presidential candidates with the most electoral votes.

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Who did the faithless electors vote for in 2016?

Three of the faithless electors voted for Colin Powell while John Kasich, Ron Paul, Bernie Sanders, and Faith Spotted Eagle each received one vote.

Does the Electoral College have to vote with the popular vote?

There is no Constitutional provision or Federal law that requires electors to vote according to the results of the popular vote in their States. Some States, however, require electors to cast their votes according to the popular vote. No elector has ever been prosecuted for failing to vote as pledged.

What does the US Constitution say about the Electoral College?

Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States,

What did the 13th amendment accomplish?

The Thirteenth Amendment—passed by the Senate on April 8, 1864; by the House on January 31, 1865; and ratified by the states on December 6, 1865— abolished slavery “within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Congress required former Confederate states to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment as a

What does the 23rd amendment have to do with the electoral college?

The amendment grants the district electors in the Electoral College as though it were a state, though the district can never have more electors than the least-populous state. The ratification of the amendment made the district the only entity other than the states to have any representation in the Electoral College.

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What happens if there is no winner in the presidential election?

A candidate must receive an absolute majority of electoral votes (currently 270) to win the presidency or the vice presidency. If no candidate receives a majority in the election for president or vice president, that election is determined via a contingency procedure established by the 12th Amendment.

What are the three major flaws of the Electoral College?

Three criticisms of the College are made:

  • It is “undemocratic;”
  • It permits the election of a candidate who does not win the most votes; and.
  • Its winner-takes-all approach cancels the votes of the losing candidates in each state.

What is an example of Electoral College?

The United States Electoral College is an example of a system in which an executive president is indirectly elected, with electors representing the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The votes of the public determine electors, who formally choose the president through the electoral college.

Who ran against Obama 2nd term?

Obama sought re-election for a second term in 2012, running virtually unopposed in the Democratic primaries. His opponent in the general election was former governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney. Obama won 332 electoral votes, defeating Romney who gained 206.

How are the amount of electors in the Electoral College determined for each state?

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.

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